The mental power of running - Women's running

The mental power of running

Author: Chris Macdonald

Read Time:   |  May 28, 2014

The mental power of running

The mental power of running

‘If you train your mind for running, everything else will be easy’. So philosophised Amby Burfoot, American runner and winner of the 1968 Boston Marathon. We asked our Women’s Running readers via our Facebook page how running has helped them in other areas of life too.

Magalie Morin Running a lot like I did for the past year helped me in so many ways. First I lost weight and I’m able to say that I love my body now when I spent most of my life hiding myself behind dark and too large outfits. Then it boosts my confidence and self-esteem especially when I run 10K races in a decent time. I feel more energetic than I never did and my running helped me a few times in my life to fight breakdowns instead of rushing after relaxing medication. I enjoy my running so much that some people say negatively that I’m an addict now but surprisingly I don’t care about what those people think because I know that it makes me happy. From my perspective this is the key of happiness: Find out and work out what makes you happy whatever it is and you will be happy with others.

Nicola de Vine My running is almost like a meditation or reflection time. It really helps me unpick problems.

Edwina Smith I gave up cigarettes two years ago and started running again. I was always a runner in my school days but got lazy as time went on. When I started I struggled to run for a single minute but I can now do four miles in half an hour. At 51 I am pleased with this and I feel euphoric after a run.

Tamara Faith Becker Hernandez Running gave me self confidence and my self respect and worth back and gave me the courage to leave an abusive marriage of 23 years and teach my kids ‘you are with something’ – Everyone is and we all deserve to be happy. And I’m proud to say that my kids are runners with me. There are too many 5Ks to count, 16 half marathons and  three marathons under my belt. I am finally truly happy! 

Antidote to heartbreak

Nathalie Reyes-Montalvo Helped me get over a breakup and through that I realised how much I love running. I enjoy it every time I hit the road.

Anne Devenney It really helped me with confidence in all aspects of my life.

La Scrappy I resolve so much while on the road, I don’t know how I lived so much of my life before realizing I was a runner!

Cat Jampuppy Everything is less difficult because of running! All positive traits are supported by what it takes to be a committed runner – tenacity, focus, self-forgiveness and therefore forgiveness of others, health, endurance, attitude. The list goes on and on and on.

Chasing new dreams

Claudia Milesi Started running few years ago. At the real beginning was so much fun, every day a bit further! Good for self esteem. Then just running wasn’t enough and the first 10K. Then friends invited to a half marathon! So that was a new challenge! And all along the way so many nice people, memories and new dreams! Just keep on running! When I started I couldn’t even imagine all the good that came from it! Much happier person now! 

Sarjna Sinha Running brings so many people from all over the world together in such a beautiful and healthy way. I wouud love to be labelled as a running addict because it makes me a better person everyday – mentally, physically, spiritually. What’s not to love about it.
Sara Tomassini I had every low self esteem: running helped me get into medical school and face the challenges of life!
Katia Rivina it helped me to finish my bachelor’s thesis. thinking of it like it’s a long distance.

Want your say? Email us at [email protected] or talk to us in the comment thread below – we will do our best to get back to you soon. Follow us on twitter via @womensrunninguk

 

 

Chris Macdonald

Editor-at-Large, Women's Running

Meet the team

We use cookies to give you a better experience on womensrunning.co.uk. By continuing to use our site, you are agreeing to the use of cookies as set in our Cookie Policy.

OK, got it